5 Industries that Should Utilize Text to TV Screen Technology

Text to TV Screen

Part of the success and appeal of text to screen technology lies in its ability to serve such a wide variety of industries. This technology is accessible to anyone who has basic texting capabilities on their cell phone: a specified telephone number is given to participants at a particular event, allowing them to text comments, ask questions and even respond to a presenter’s question or poll. Participant text is then broadcasted live on screen for the other attendees and presenters to view.

Although texting technology is applicable to any industry that places emphasis on engaging an audience or clientele, certain industries are a natural fit. We’ve listed out five of these industries and their potential uses for text to tv screen technology:

1. Business, Any Sector
Text to tv screen is useful at staff meetings, presentations and just about any company event imaginable. Consider this technology for large corporations or group meetings in which not every employee may get a chance to speak or give feedback. Also, if an employee wants to ask a question or make a comment anonymously, he or she has the ability to do so. Increasing the amount of feedback and accessibility during a presentation and the ability to gauge an audience are just a couple benefits that text to screen technology can provide in a corporate setting.

2. Television Programming
Television broadcasting has come a long way in creating an interactive experience for home viewers. Text to tv screen technology adds another avenue for viewers to feel as though they are actively taking part in the viewing experience. Texting commentary or pictures might be encouraged by a local news station to enhance a viewer’s sense of community, or a television program may broadcast viewer opinions submitted via text. These experiences create a unique and interactive opportunity for both broadcaster and viewer.

3. Education
With an increasing number of schools applying the latest technologies to their classrooms, text to screen technology has many applications in the academic field. While students have the ability to answer and ask questions via text, professors are better able to direct class discussion to meet students’ needs. Students who often forgo asking important questions in class can ask questions without fear of judgement. Additionally, asking large groups of students to respond to a question via text to screen technology provides professors a unique opportunity to asses student comprehension.

4. Entertainment
Concerts and sporting events with large monitors provide great opportunities to utilize text to screen technology. Audience member commentary can add an element of fun and excitement to an already charged event.

5. Politics
In this industry, audience insight and commentary is abundant. Text to screen technology is a great way to broadcast the many voices and opinions that occur during large-scale political events.

Although these industries are varied, text to screen technology helps them all achieve a common goal: engaging as many people as possible to create a positive impact.

For more information about Mosio for Events pricing and plans, visit: http://www.mosio.com/eventsplans

Texting Can Save Lives by Preventing Youth Suicide


With frequent headlines condemning texting due to everything from poor grammar to car accidents caused by texting while driving, texting may seem more like a curse than a blessing. If used where teens and young adults can most use the help, however, texting could actually save lives.

Youth Suicide is a Serious Concern

Suicide is the 3rd leading cause of death for youth ages 10-24, according to the CDC, resulting in the loss of about 4,600 young lives every year. Even more at risk are LGBT youth, who are 4 times more likely to attempt suicide than their straight peers due to bullying, harassment, abuse, and other victimization.

Youth Choose to Communicate by Text

The Pew Research Center reports that over 3 in 4 teens ages 12-17 have a cellphone and a sizable portion (25% ) access the internet mostly from their phone. This is especially important when considering that 71% of teens say the home computer they use most often is shared with other family members, offering them little privacy.

A whopping 75% of all teens text, as another Pew study found, with older teens (ages 14-17) texting a median of 100 texts a day. Furthermore, only 14% use a landline to talk with friends.

Texting for Suicide Prevention

In recent years, instant messaging as a method of suicide prevention has taken root in an attempt to each more people who may be more comfortable with communication over the internet rather than over the phone. While hotlines and instant messaging are admirable efforts, they may be missing the mark on helping this critical age group.

In northeastern Minnesota, several nonprofits and agencies have already had success with TXT4LIFE, the text-message option as part of their crisis hotline system. The text option is more popular, logging as much as 33 times as many text sessions as phone calls. In 2012 alone, TXT4LIFE aided 1,985 youth seeking help.

Given that youth are especially susceptible to suicide and avid users of text messaging, using text messaging as a suicide prevention tool is not only a possibility but a necessity.

This article presented by Mosio Two Way Text Messaging Software


Anti Bullying Text Messaging Service | Nancy Lublin: Texting that saves lives [VIDEO]

Anti Bullying Text Messaging – Software and Service

Bullying continues to be a huge problem in and out of schools. The most recent news of Karen Klein (the school bus monitor who was bullied by a few middle schoolers in Greece, NY) has brought even more needed attention to the issue. The outpouring of support she continues to receive shows that nearly everyone has a personal story or association with it.

Techno Justice

If Karen’s bullying hadn’t been caught on a mobile phone, a completely different story would be told. One of “she said, they said” and “kids will be kids”, but technology in this case didn’t only save the day. It shed a global light on how cruel bullies can be. Mosio currently powers text messaging software and solutions for anti-bullying services and the product team is currently working on building out our platform to include the newest mobile technologies to help those who are bullied get the assistance they need to put an end to it. That said, text messaging is absolutely the best channel on mobile devices to help kids, teens and young adults report instances of bullying and get the best support.

There’s a great TED Talk from Nancy Lublin below that talks about the power of text messaging and how it saves lives. In her talk she gives several different examples of how her organization helps thousands of young people every year, bullying being one of them. If you have a few minutes, definitely watch the video and if you are looking for a text messaging solution for anti bullying, please let us know. We’re happy to help and will put together a quick quote for service for your school or organization.

Expert Q&A: Text Messaging for Teen and Young Adult Health Services (Stephanie Kline and Alice Bacon, Scarleteen)

According to a new report by Nielsen Company, US teenagers have been cited as the fastest growing audience enamored of mobile content. While that might not seem like a huge surprise to many reading this, a popular reason we get calls from helplines and hotlines about integrating text messaging into their services is decreasing phone call volume. Scarleteen is one of the most popular teen and young adult services online, so we asked Stephanie Kline and Alice Bacon to answer a few questions for us regarding mobile technology and text messaging as it relates to teen and young adult health services.

* Hi Stephanie and Alice, thanks so much for your time. Tell us a little bit about yourselves and what you do.

Scarleteen is an online comprehensive sexuality education resource for teens and young adults. Like many of the others that work with Scarleteen, we are volunteers at the site. Between the two of us, we work the text-in service, answer questions at the boards, answer questions in the Sexpert Advice column, and have written articles. Alice also works outreach at a local teen shelter.

* How do you see text messaging helping teens and young adults learn about health and sex education?

Text messaging can be especially helpful for teens and young adults because it reaches them at their level. This generation is more mobile than in the past, reaching them individually on their cells is a good way to keep their attention and also keep them in proximity to important info. It also means a way of finding answers to questions quickly, and knowing it’s from a source they trust rather than just trusting what they might have heard somewhere.

In general, other places embracing text as a way of outreach can be helpful in its own, as it allows us to reach generations in ways that they feel more comfortable communicating.

* What got you started in texting (personally)?

Alice: What got me started in text personally…. I was finding that with a busy life I didn’t have a lot of time for answering in depth questions on the boards, so when we started doing text I saw it as an opportunity to scatter my Scarleteen work into small portions throughout the day and night.

Stephanie: Actually, I was a little reluctant, as I didn’t do much texting myself. But I had some time free when they were offering the webinar, so I figured I might as well get trained in case text was ever short handed. But I also found it fit better into my always hectic schedule – so now I love working that area.

* How have mobile phones and texting changed how your organization offers support?

Text messaging can offer real-time support where a teen or young adult may otherwise not have a way to get that. It’s especially handy for a teen or young adult who is out in the world, away from their computer, and needs advice or guidance regarding purchasing a pregnancy test, obtaining emergency contraception, reporting or getting services regarding a rape, etc.
* Advice you’d give to organizations considering implementing text messaging or mobile technologies?

Offering a text service can be really helpful, and it’s really pretty simple. As you go along, you’ll see what questions tend to come often, and what responses you give more than others. Setting up template answers saves a lot of time, and having an idea of what boundaries you’ll expect from users ahead of time helps things run smoothly.

* What kind of mobile phone do you have? If you are able to download apps to it, which is your favorite?

Alice: I have a Blackberry Curve, and my favorite two applications are Pandora Radio and Yelp.

Stephanie: I have a Sony Ericsson MP3 phone, so no apps but love the music.

* About the Experts:

Alice: I am a hard working single mom of a wonderful 4 year old boy named Nolan. I reside in the Seattle area where I am a full-time college student and a part-time worker of many assorted jobs. I have an intense passion for sexual health, domestic violence prevention and supporting pregnant and parenting teens. I also love reading, writing for fun, baking, blowing bubbles and hanging out with close friends.

Stephanie: I’ve spent most of my time for years working with children and adults with special needs. After 4 1/2 years of hard work and studying, I graduated with a degree in Elementary Education and Special Education. Now I teach for an alternative education school. It’s a wonderful challenge. I continue my work with Scarleteen and sexual education, as I remember what my sex ed classes were like and hope for much better for the students going through those courses today. When not in my classroom I’m usually found with friends and family, continuing writing, reading, exploring and traveling.

Scarleteen: Sex Education for the Real World

Donate to Scarleteen: help more teens and young adults

10 Reasons You Should Be Texting with Students, On or Off Campus

We are contacted regularly by administrators, librarians and educators interested in text messaging with students for a variety of reasons. We’re not talking about campus emergency SMS blasting. While it is a valuable security tool for alerting students and faculty of danger in real-time, we specializing in conversational, two way text messaging. Essentially it is the same way students are accustomed to texting with each other.

Here are 10 things we hear from our prospects and existing customers regarding implementing text messaging to communicate with students. We recently did a Q&A session with Curtis Marsh from KU Info (University of Kansas) about using text messaging for student services that is worth a read. KU Info is one of the more popular services at the University of Kansas, set up originally in the 1970s to dispel rumors and now used as a general information line.

1. “They don’t respond to email.”

2. “They have so many different types of phones and text messaging reaches them all.”

3. “Your service lets me document my text conversations in a single place.”

4. “Texting lets them share information easily with each other.”

5. “I don’t have to text from MY phone, I type on your website.”

6. “We need to communicate with a lot of students at the same time.”

7. “We have been using instant messaging, but it doesn’t reach [students] away from their computers.”

8. “I like that I’m able to get back to them later after I find what they’re looking for, sending a single text message follow up.”

9. “Sending a single message update to a handful of our students and then letting them respond directly to us is so cool!”

10. “Answering questions was easy. I just sat down and clicked on the big red Answer button.”

You might have your own reasons for reading this list. If you have any more you’d like us to add, let us know and we’ll add them. Bottom line, text messaging is the best way to communicate with students, on or off of campus.

Expert Q&A: Using Text Messaging for Student Services (Curtis Marsh, KU Info)

Curtis Marsh, Program Director, KU Info

* Tell us about yourself and what you do at the University of Kansas.

I work at the University of Kansas for a program called KU Info.  It’s a collaboration between KU Student Services and the KU Libraries.  The program provides the extended KU community a place to go for their questions about KU life and beyond.

* How do you see text messaging helping students on campus?

With some highly visible violence on campuses the last few years, KU joined the growing number of schools that have an emergency communication systems using  text messaging.  Our Libraries offer an ask-a-librarian service with email, instant messaging and text messaging. KU Info uses a text message system through Mosio.  These are all positive uses of texting services for students, but I feel KU and other universities need to put more focus on such services to increase awareness and usage.  The emergency systems are perfect uses for texting students as long as they have strict parameters for what messages are sent. You want the user to be highly alert when a text comes from the emergency system, so resist the temptation to use it for any other purpose.

* When did you start personally sending and receiving text messages?

I started texting to communicate quickly with my student employees (Why r u late 4 ur shift?!).  Now I reach out via text to friends, family, neighbors, etc.  Like email, it is a good way to send your message when its most convenient for you, and give your recipient time to respond when its most convenient for them.

* How have mobile phones changed your industry?

The biggest change mobile phones have created in my industry is the expectation for instant information.  Before mobile phones (and the internet), KU Info would frequently ask for the user’s contact info so they could get back with them once the answer was obtained.  We rarely do that anymore because of the expectation that the information is immediately available. Thankfully, with well-maintained online resources, that information is indeed immediately available.

* What tips would you give to anyone considering implementing text messaging or mobile technologies for student services?

We almost never push messages to our users.  We would much rather them pull messages from us.  It is tough to give away that much control, but it is a much better way to strengthen the relationship.  I feel that every time our user perceives a message from us as unsolicited, we lose a small piece of their trust. We ask their permission to send messages, then ask them what kind they wish to receive. Again, not easy to offer truly customized messaging, but even an attempt in that direction increases the user’s perception of a one-on-one relationship.

* Any other thoughts about mobile technologies?

It seems right to communicate with our students the way they communicate with each other.  But it is so important to keep from intruding.  We don’t want users to feel the way they did the first time their parents looked at their Facebook page. We want them to view it as a convenience that they can communicate with us via text, not a nuisance that we are trying to use their social medium to do business with them.  A few well-placed messages will keep the user interested without the risk of them ignoring you or worse, blocking your number!

* What kind of mobile phone do you have and any thoughts about apps?

Just got an LG smart phone with Android. Still learning about all the cool apps, but certainly enjoying the voice recognition ones that allow me to speak everything from text messages to full dictation.  Advanced Task Killer is one I think will help me a lot with the to-do list.

* More about Curtis:

Curtis Marsh is on his 16th year at the University of Kansas, having spent five years in technology transfer, six years as Associate Director of Marketing for Continuing Education, and now Program Director of KU Info.  In the late 90’s, he left KU for a few years to work for the Kauffman Foundation and get an MBA from University of Missouri, Kansas City. The common thread between all these positions has been marketing and outreach for the university. In 2010, he added the function of Program Director for the Learning Studio.  The ultimate partnership between libraries and student services, the Learning Studio combines a major campus library with several primary student services offices to create an interactive study environment in the center of campus.

Text a Tip Poster – San Francisco Police Department – (SMS Tips and Crime Watch)

For information on setting up Text a Crime Tip Software for Cities, Police Departments and Crime Watch Organizations.

For info about Text a Tip Software for School and Campus Safety.

SFPD Text a Tip - Mosio Mobile Solutions

Text a Crime Tip Poster – San Francisco Police Department

Taken on Valencia Street in San Francisco, CA.

Mobile Text Messaging Crime Tips

(photo taken by Mosio, Mobile Information Systems)


Mosio Mobile Information Systems – Text Messaging Info for Students & Education (Video)

Mosio’s mobile messaging systems enable teachers, administrators, counselors and student information specialists to set up mobile communications for students, increasing on-the-go access to campus information, reporting real-time emergencies or for questions and answers about classes, events, dates, etc.

The service is web-based, accessible from any internet connected computer, with nothing to download or install and no hardware to buy.

The result is a more informed student body, safer campuses and the ability to promote student services, events and retail outlets.

For more information about Mosio’s mobile solutions, sign up for a live demo.

Mobile Answers – About Mobile Software as a Service, Mobile Cloud Computing and the Future of Mobility

Mobile Answers

Mobile Answers – by Mosio

Welcome to our new information, news and commentary resource on  technologies, software as a service, cloud computing and all things mobile. This site was created and is maintained by those of us who work at Mosio, creators of Text a Librarian, the award winning AskMosio Community and Mosio for Businesses, enabling businesses and organizations to communicate with their customers and members on thier mobile devices.

We welcome you to visit often and if you’re interested in how Mosio can help your organization harness the mobile channel, please visit us at www.mosio.com.

Thanks and we look forward to speaking with you.

Have a curious day,

The Mosio Team
Mobile Information Systems

Connecting you and your customers on their mobile devices.
SXSW Web Awards 2008 Mobile Winner