5 Things to Consider When Looking for a Helpline Vendor

Mosio-Helpline-Vendor

When looking for a helpline vendor there are many things to take into consideration. Here are 5 things you should consider when looking for a helpline vendor:

1. When should an organization decide it is best to outsource these services?

BrdsNBz clients have experienced situations when they feel it is best to outsource textline programs. Some of them have come to us with existing programs that are faltering and others recognize they must implement a textline offering as soon as possible if they are going to communicate successfully with adolescents.

For organizations with current programs:

  • Current staff – health educators and marketers – can no longer support an existing service without negatively affecting their time spent on other services the organization offers

For organizations needing to provide a new service:

  • Youth have limited access to services due to geography, demographics, etc.
  • Youth express a need for communication about available services in a particular area
  • Organizational capacity, including a need for a higher level of marketing strategy and planning with experience in youth-based textline services and an inability to implement services based on existing funding
  • Lack of expertise in a wide range of adolescent-related topic-specific areas (sexual health, peer pressure, related topics, health relationships, etc.)

2. What questions should someone interested in a textline service ask potential vendors?

  • How long have you been in business?
  • Is your service a hot line or a warm line? On average, how quickly are incoming questions responded to?
  • Describe the process for ‘conversations’ between teens and your staff.
  • How is your staff trained? What are their credentials?
  • What technology and processes do you use to facilitate a large influx of texts at one time?
  • How are crisis texts handled?
  • Do you make referrals? How is that process established with your client? How are referrals shared with adolescents?
  • What marketing support, if any, do you provide your clients?
  • Is quality improvement a part of the service you provide?
  • What reporting, if any, do you provide? How frequently are reports provided and what information is included in those reports?
  • Is your service validated through research – either primary or secondary?
  • What types of organizations have you worked with? (For example, state health departments, regional adolescent-focused organizations, etc.)
  • How do you support sustainability for your clients?
  • How do you manage the project?
  • How is your service priced?
  • Are there other optional services available? If so, what are those?

3. Text messaging is obviously very popular among young adults. Should helplines be focused on any other channels or is text messaging a great start/add on?

If your outreach to young adults does not include text messaging, then you are missing a large part of your market. Here’s some of the primary research on the topic from The Pew Center.

Pew Center Update on Teens, Smartphones and Texting

Teens and Texting

  • The volume of texting among teens has risen from 50 texts a day in 2009 to 60 texts for the median teen text user. Older teens, boys, and blacks are leading the increase. Texting is the dominant daily mode of communication between teens and all those with whom they communicate.
  • Much of this increase occurred among older teens ages 14-17, who went from a median of 60 texts a day to a median of 100 two years later. Boys of all ages also increased their texting volume from a median of 30 texts daily in 2009 to 50 texts in 2011. Black teens showed an increase of a median of 60 texts per day to 80.
  • Older girls remain the most enthusiastic texters, with a median of 100 texts a day in 2011, compared with 50 for boys the same age.
  • 63% of all teens say they exchange text messages every day with people in their lives. This far surpasses the frequency with which they pick other forms of daily communication, including phone calling by cell phone (39% do that with others every day), face-to-face socializing outside of school (35%), social network site messaging (29%), instant messaging (22%), talking on landlines (19%) and emailing (6%).

Teens and Phone Calls

  • The frequency of teens’ phone chatter with friends – on cell phones and landlines – has fallen. But the heaviest texters are also the heaviest talkers with their friends.
  • Teens’ phone conversations with friends are slipping in frequency.
  • 14% of all teens say they talk daily with friends on a landline, down from 30% who said so in 2009. Nearly a third (31%) of teens say they never talk on a landline with friends (or report that they cannot do so).
  • 26% of all teens (including those with and without cell phones) say they talk daily with friends on their cell phone, down from 38% of teens in 2009.
  • About one in four teens report owning a smartphone.
  • Three quarters of teens – 77% – have cell phones.

4.     What advice can you share for an organization looking to get started?

  • Focus on sustainability from the beginning
  • Identify appropriate marketing funding to reach your target population and support organizational capacity for marketing
  • Set marketing benchmarks and monitor frequently against those benchmarks
  • Engage community partners such as schools and other youth-based organizations
  • Involve youth as peer mentors or leaders
  • Find a vendor who has significant experience and can share best practices from other implementations across the country

5.     How long does it typically take to get a program up and running?

BrdsNBz has implemented a new program from pre-launch to soft launch in as little as six weeks.  If a client needs a service implemented sooner, we will work with them to meet their specific deadlines, if at all possible.  A typical BrdsNBz implementation timeframe would be eight – ten weeks.

 

APPCNC and OneSeventeen Media Public-Private Partnership

Over the past five years, our public-private partnership has been a model for how for-profits and nonprofits can create sustainability.  APPCNC’s BrdsNBz text messaging service launched in North Carolina in early 2009 to national accolades within a few short months. By taking BrdsNBz and “franchising” it across the country, we have validated our belief that BrdsNBz’s award winning success with this kind of collaboration produces on-going positive returns.

 

About The Authors

 

Beth Carls, Co-founder, CEO, OneSeventeen Media – Beth began her career as a healthcare marketer with Hospital Corporation of America (HCA). In 1990 she decided to take her first entrepreneurial plunge by co-founding a marketing design firm, 7 Seventeen Group, with business partner Amy Looper.  From 1996-1999, Beth helped found and grow a private Internet professional services firm – the fastest growing private company in Houston. In 1999, they IPO’d with a $158M valuation and over 1200 employees.  Beth wanted to work as a social venture entrepreneur, so she and Looper teamed up once again and in 2000, Beth took the helm and served as CEO, Chairman of the Board and Co-Founder of a company that produced online interactive tools to help almost 500 schools and over 400,000 kids stay in school and develop their character skills. Her latest venture, OneSeventeen Media, is passionate about helping teens + tweens thrive through social networking. In her spare time over the past 14 years, Beth teaches online graduate and undergraduate courses in Marketing and Public Relations at The University of Phoenix.  She earned her B.B.A. in Marketing from Sam Houston State and her M.B.A. in Marketing and Management from Abilene Christian University.

 

Kennon Jackson, Jr., MA, BrdsNBz National Director, APPCNC – Kennon has over 17 years of experience working in outcome-focused program management – specifically in areas of child- and family-health services.  He has had both personal and professional opportunities to serve youth with several umbrella-style non-profits at the state level – like APPCNC.   These experiences have given him the opportunity to provide training and technical assistance in evaluation capacity building, strategic planning, and program management for many non-profit agencies and other professionals in this area during his career.  Kennon has substantial work experience with federal entities as well – serving as a Project Coordinator and an Evaluation Officer for the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration [SAMHSA] and the United States Department of State, respectively.  He had the pleasure to work with some of the country’s leading experts in adolescent health at the Johns Hopkins School of Public Health – Center for Adolescent Health.  In his volunteer time for his local community, Kennon serves as Board Chair for Communities in Schools (CIS) of Cumberland County, Board Development Committee for Planned Parenthood of Central North Carolina (PPCNC), and volunteers with the Cape Fear Regional Theater.  Kennon earned his B.S. in Biology from Davidson College and an M.A. in Public Policy from the Duke University Graduate School.

 

Text Messaging News: Texting service for expecting moms, Digital Way to Share STD Status Now Available in LAUSD, Service lets kids report bullying via text message

Photo©Reuters

Digital Way to Share STD Status Now Available in LAUSD

A new service has been created to help sexually active people have safe sex. Users of the service will be able to share with one another their own status in regards to sexually transmitted diseases straight from their mobile with the tap of a button. This service has been mainly targeted at young people who may not yet understand the importance of having safe sex. By using smartphones to share this information with one another, young people will feel right at home.

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Service lets kids report bullying via text message

Bullying is never a nice thing to experience, and many helplines out there are available to help those in need of help. A new service will allow children to quietly report to school officials if they are being bullied or if they’ve witnessed bullying themselves through the use of their own cell phones. Kids will be able to text a number for free to alert teachers about any bullying occurring. We think this is a great step to take as children at school can often feel pressured and too scared to make contact with an adult in person.

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Texting service for expecting moms

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Ozark Center takes counseling via texting community wide

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Mobile phones revolutionise youth creativity

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Text Messaging News: New Twist on the “House Call” by Doctors, Nonsensical texting may be only sign of stroke, Crisis hotlines turning to text to reach teens

Mobile Phone Program Helps Hearts

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Nonsensical texting may be only sign of stroke

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AAN: Texting Cuts Time to Stroke Treatment

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New Twist on the “House Call” by Doctors

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Crisis hotlines turning to text to reach teens

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Text Messaging News: Text messages help cholera fight in Mozambique, Cutting costs and saving lives, Digital Coping Tools

Text messages help cholera fight in Mozambique

Resource guide points cancer patients to digital coping tools

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Text messages help cholera fight in Mozambique

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Ipswich Hospital saves £1m through appointment reminder system

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Text alerts: Cutting costs, and saving lives

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Teens send text messages to get questions about sex answered

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Texting News: Texting preferences for mHealth, Text Messaging to Improve Teen Health, Payments by text message service

Texting preferences for mHealth are just another thing teenagers are picky about

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Text Messaging to Improve Teen Health

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New text message based customer loyalty reward program

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Payments by text message service to launch in UK in spring 2014

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Customer’s text message stops robbery attempt

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Text Messaging News Update: Texting Could Help Spread the Word on Teen Health, Customize Customer Service, Success of Text Message Diabetes Intervention

Texting Could Help Spread the Word on Teen Health

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Miami Children’s Hospital Receives Award for Its Web-based Marketing of Texting Services

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How Mobile Apps Can Customize Customer Service

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There’s A Simple Way For Stores To Insantly Improve Customer Service

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WSU researcher to evaluate success of text message diabetes intervention

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Anti Bullying Text Messaging Service | Nancy Lublin: Texting that saves lives [VIDEO]

Anti Bullying Text Messaging – Software and Service

Bullying continues to be a huge problem in and out of schools. The most recent news of Karen Klein (the school bus monitor who was bullied by a few middle schoolers in Greece, NY) has brought even more needed attention to the issue. The outpouring of support she continues to receive shows that nearly everyone has a personal story or association with it.

Techno Justice

If Karen’s bullying hadn’t been caught on a mobile phone, a completely different story would be told. One of “she said, they said” and “kids will be kids”, but technology in this case didn’t only save the day. It shed a global light on how cruel bullies can be. Mosio currently powers text messaging software and solutions for anti-bullying services and the product team is currently working on building out our platform to include the newest mobile technologies to help those who are bullied get the assistance they need to put an end to it. That said, text messaging is absolutely the best channel on mobile devices to help kids, teens and young adults report instances of bullying and get the best support.

There’s a great TED Talk from Nancy Lublin below that talks about the power of text messaging and how it saves lives. In her talk she gives several different examples of how her organization helps thousands of young people every year, bullying being one of them. If you have a few minutes, definitely watch the video and if you are looking for a text messaging solution for anti bullying, please let us know. We’re happy to help and will put together a quick quote for service for your school or organization.

The Benefits of Using Text Messaging [INFOGRAPHIC] – Great for Businesses, Health Services and Education

We love infographics, so when this was sent our way, we figured we’d post it,especially since it lists a few (of many) of the benefits of texting. Businesses, non-profits, schools, libraries and event managers use our platform to provide their customers, members, students and attendees with best-in-class text messaging services and we are fortunate enough to be in a segment of the mobile industry that all mobile users are familiar with.

The infographic below lists some of the great benefits of text messaging, including Social Therapy, Sunscreen Adherence, Curbing Alcohol Intake and Encouraging Prenatal Care.

A few others of note (but not included on the graphic):
Stopping Bullying
Providing Mental Health Services
Medical and Clinical Trials Research
Providing Library Patrons with Access to Librarian Knowledge
Improving Guest Services at Hotels and Resorts
Customer Feedback and Satisfaction Surveys
Public Service Alerts About Road Closings and Construction

The Benefits of Texting

 

From: OnlineCollegeCourses.com

 

Special Thanks to OnlineCollegeCourses.com for the share!

Disaster Distress Helpline’s Twitter Chat – Tuesday, May 8, 2012 @ 8-9pm EST

It’s Mental Health Awareness month, get involved!

The Disaster Distress Helpline (a program of SAMHSA) is hosting a live Twitter Chat on Tuesday, May 8th from 8-9 P.M. EST for parents/caregivers on helping children and teenagers cope after disasters. Use the hashtag #youthcopeChat to ask questions and join the conversation! For more information, please visit https://www.facebook.com/distresshelpline or follow @distressline on Twitter.  Chat presenters include; Christian Burgess (@cburgessDDH), LMSW, Director, Disaster Distress Helpline and Dr. April Naturale (@anaturale), Senior Advisor, SAMHSA Disaster Technical Assistance Center.

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Join the #youthcopeChat on 5/8 at 8pm EST to learn how to help youth cope after #disasters. For more updates check out @distressline!

Text Messaging for Help Line Service Providers – Health Education and Public Assistance Call Centers

Text Messaging is a Great Way to Help Those In Need

The growing usefulness of text messaging as a communication tool originally stemmed from wanting to keep in touch with friends and family. It has quickly grown to a way of interacting with businesses through mobile marketing, voting on tv shows like American Idol and more recently as a two-way method of communicating with organizations offering assistance and help.

We’re seeing it used by organizations who want to provide health advice and sex education services to teens and young adults, as a way of preventing those in desperate times who are contemplating hurting themselves or who are simply distressed by uncontrollable happenings in their surroundings, like the oil spill or natural disasters.

The three main benefits of offering text messaging as a help line service are:

1) The ability to be able to receive and reply to text messages anonymously.
Not all text messaging software providers have this option, so ask first.

2) Text messaging is more teen and young adult-friendly than phone calls or email.
A Pew study found that 63% of all teens say they exchange text messages every day with people in their lives, including their parents. Also, nearly half of all teens send and receive text messages with friends daily. 39% of teens never exchange e-mail.

3) Efficient information exchanges.
Responders can be assisting multiple people at once and also have the ability to send back specific information via text message that doesn’t need to be written down. For those with smart phones, a link to more information and data can be sent quickly, making the experience seamless.

One of our text messaging for helplines clients is the TALKWITHUS campaign. Here are some promotional pieces for those, including one from the Surgeon General.

Talk With Us Helpline – Oil Spill Radio Spot

Expert Q&A: Text Messaging for Teen and Young Adult Health Services (Stephanie Kline and Alice Bacon, Scarleteen)

According to a new report by Nielsen Company, US teenagers have been cited as the fastest growing audience enamored of mobile content. While that might not seem like a huge surprise to many reading this, a popular reason we get calls from helplines and hotlines about integrating text messaging into their services is decreasing phone call volume. Scarleteen is one of the most popular teen and young adult services online, so we asked Stephanie Kline and Alice Bacon to answer a few questions for us regarding mobile technology and text messaging as it relates to teen and young adult health services.

* Hi Stephanie and Alice, thanks so much for your time. Tell us a little bit about yourselves and what you do.

Scarleteen is an online comprehensive sexuality education resource for teens and young adults. Like many of the others that work with Scarleteen, we are volunteers at the site. Between the two of us, we work the text-in service, answer questions at the boards, answer questions in the Sexpert Advice column, and have written articles. Alice also works outreach at a local teen shelter.

* How do you see text messaging helping teens and young adults learn about health and sex education?

Text messaging can be especially helpful for teens and young adults because it reaches them at their level. This generation is more mobile than in the past, reaching them individually on their cells is a good way to keep their attention and also keep them in proximity to important info. It also means a way of finding answers to questions quickly, and knowing it’s from a source they trust rather than just trusting what they might have heard somewhere.

In general, other places embracing text as a way of outreach can be helpful in its own, as it allows us to reach generations in ways that they feel more comfortable communicating.

* What got you started in texting (personally)?

Alice: What got me started in text personally…. I was finding that with a busy life I didn’t have a lot of time for answering in depth questions on the boards, so when we started doing text I saw it as an opportunity to scatter my Scarleteen work into small portions throughout the day and night.

Stephanie: Actually, I was a little reluctant, as I didn’t do much texting myself. But I had some time free when they were offering the webinar, so I figured I might as well get trained in case text was ever short handed. But I also found it fit better into my always hectic schedule – so now I love working that area.

* How have mobile phones and texting changed how your organization offers support?

Text messaging can offer real-time support where a teen or young adult may otherwise not have a way to get that. It’s especially handy for a teen or young adult who is out in the world, away from their computer, and needs advice or guidance regarding purchasing a pregnancy test, obtaining emergency contraception, reporting or getting services regarding a rape, etc.
* Advice you’d give to organizations considering implementing text messaging or mobile technologies?

Offering a text service can be really helpful, and it’s really pretty simple. As you go along, you’ll see what questions tend to come often, and what responses you give more than others. Setting up template answers saves a lot of time, and having an idea of what boundaries you’ll expect from users ahead of time helps things run smoothly.

* What kind of mobile phone do you have? If you are able to download apps to it, which is your favorite?

Alice: I have a Blackberry Curve, and my favorite two applications are Pandora Radio and Yelp.

Stephanie: I have a Sony Ericsson MP3 phone, so no apps but love the music.

* About the Experts:

Alice: I am a hard working single mom of a wonderful 4 year old boy named Nolan. I reside in the Seattle area where I am a full-time college student and a part-time worker of many assorted jobs. I have an intense passion for sexual health, domestic violence prevention and supporting pregnant and parenting teens. I also love reading, writing for fun, baking, blowing bubbles and hanging out with close friends.

Stephanie: I’ve spent most of my time for years working with children and adults with special needs. After 4 1/2 years of hard work and studying, I graduated with a degree in Elementary Education and Special Education. Now I teach for an alternative education school. It’s a wonderful challenge. I continue my work with Scarleteen and sexual education, as I remember what my sex ed classes were like and hope for much better for the students going through those courses today. When not in my classroom I’m usually found with friends and family, continuing writing, reading, exploring and traveling.

Scarleteen: Sex Education for the Real World

Donate to Scarleteen: help more teens and young adults

10 Reasons You Should Be Texting with Students, On or Off Campus

We are contacted regularly by administrators, librarians and educators interested in text messaging with students for a variety of reasons. We’re not talking about campus emergency SMS blasting. While it is a valuable security tool for alerting students and faculty of danger in real-time, we specializing in conversational, two way text messaging. Essentially it is the same way students are accustomed to texting with each other.

Here are 10 things we hear from our prospects and existing customers regarding implementing text messaging to communicate with students. We recently did a Q&A session with Curtis Marsh from KU Info (University of Kansas) about using text messaging for student services that is worth a read. KU Info is one of the more popular services at the University of Kansas, set up originally in the 1970s to dispel rumors and now used as a general information line.

1. “They don’t respond to email.”

2. “They have so many different types of phones and text messaging reaches them all.”

3. “Your service lets me document my text conversations in a single place.”

4. “Texting lets them share information easily with each other.”

5. “I don’t have to text from MY phone, I type on your website.”

6. “We need to communicate with a lot of students at the same time.”

7. “We have been using instant messaging, but it doesn’t reach [students] away from their computers.”

8. “I like that I’m able to get back to them later after I find what they’re looking for, sending a single text message follow up.”

9. “Sending a single message update to a handful of our students and then letting them respond directly to us is so cool!”

10. “Answering questions was easy. I just sat down and clicked on the big red Answer button.”

You might have your own reasons for reading this list. If you have any more you’d like us to add, let us know and we’ll add them. Bottom line, text messaging is the best way to communicate with students, on or off of campus.

Expert Q&A: Using Text Messaging for Student Services (Curtis Marsh, KU Info)

Curtis Marsh, Program Director, KU Info

* Tell us about yourself and what you do at the University of Kansas.

I work at the University of Kansas for a program called KU Info.  It’s a collaboration between KU Student Services and the KU Libraries.  The program provides the extended KU community a place to go for their questions about KU life and beyond.

* How do you see text messaging helping students on campus?

With some highly visible violence on campuses the last few years, KU joined the growing number of schools that have an emergency communication systems using  text messaging.  Our Libraries offer an ask-a-librarian service with email, instant messaging and text messaging. KU Info uses a text message system through Mosio.  These are all positive uses of texting services for students, but I feel KU and other universities need to put more focus on such services to increase awareness and usage.  The emergency systems are perfect uses for texting students as long as they have strict parameters for what messages are sent. You want the user to be highly alert when a text comes from the emergency system, so resist the temptation to use it for any other purpose.

* When did you start personally sending and receiving text messages?

I started texting to communicate quickly with my student employees (Why r u late 4 ur shift?!).  Now I reach out via text to friends, family, neighbors, etc.  Like email, it is a good way to send your message when its most convenient for you, and give your recipient time to respond when its most convenient for them.

* How have mobile phones changed your industry?

The biggest change mobile phones have created in my industry is the expectation for instant information.  Before mobile phones (and the internet), KU Info would frequently ask for the user’s contact info so they could get back with them once the answer was obtained.  We rarely do that anymore because of the expectation that the information is immediately available. Thankfully, with well-maintained online resources, that information is indeed immediately available.

* What tips would you give to anyone considering implementing text messaging or mobile technologies for student services?

We almost never push messages to our users.  We would much rather them pull messages from us.  It is tough to give away that much control, but it is a much better way to strengthen the relationship.  I feel that every time our user perceives a message from us as unsolicited, we lose a small piece of their trust. We ask their permission to send messages, then ask them what kind they wish to receive. Again, not easy to offer truly customized messaging, but even an attempt in that direction increases the user’s perception of a one-on-one relationship.

* Any other thoughts about mobile technologies?

It seems right to communicate with our students the way they communicate with each other.  But it is so important to keep from intruding.  We don’t want users to feel the way they did the first time their parents looked at their Facebook page. We want them to view it as a convenience that they can communicate with us via text, not a nuisance that we are trying to use their social medium to do business with them.  A few well-placed messages will keep the user interested without the risk of them ignoring you or worse, blocking your number!

* What kind of mobile phone do you have and any thoughts about apps?

Just got an LG smart phone with Android. Still learning about all the cool apps, but certainly enjoying the voice recognition ones that allow me to speak everything from text messages to full dictation.  Advanced Task Killer is one I think will help me a lot with the to-do list.

* More about Curtis:

Curtis Marsh is on his 16th year at the University of Kansas, having spent five years in technology transfer, six years as Associate Director of Marketing for Continuing Education, and now Program Director of KU Info.  In the late 90’s, he left KU for a few years to work for the Kauffman Foundation and get an MBA from University of Missouri, Kansas City. The common thread between all these positions has been marketing and outreach for the university. In 2010, he added the function of Program Director for the Learning Studio.  The ultimate partnership between libraries and student services, the Learning Studio combines a major campus library with several primary student services offices to create an interactive study environment in the center of campus.

Sex and Health Education for Teens and Young Adults via Mobile Text Messaging – Private, Personal, Anonymous and Effective

Mosio: Text Messaging for Health Education Services

Mosio’s Mobile Text Messaging Solutions for Health Services

There are a number of reasons health centers on campus and in the community are looking into new methods of communicating with Gen-Y, and it makes sense. In order to stay current and connected with teens and young adults, it is imperative to explore the technologies they are using the most.

Mobile text messaging is one of the best communication tools an organization can use today. Numbers tell the story:

  • 4.1 billion text messages are sent each day in the U.S. (CTIA Wireless)
  • Americans overall send and receive twice as many text messages as phone calls per month. (Nielsen Mobile)
  • U.S. Teens (ages 13-17) sent and received an average of 1,742 text messages per month in Q2 2008. (Nielsen Mobile)
  • Text messaging has overtaken email and instant messaging as the main form of communication for college students. (Technology Marketing Corporation)

Text messaging isn’t a fad and it isn’t a new social networking site that will be outdated for a new one in a matter of years. It’s not just growing by leaps and bounds. Texting has quickly become the preferred method of communication for the average American.

160 characters may not seem like enough to convey a question, answer or thought, but the nature of text messaging is quick and to-the-point interactions. In addition, there are new technologies enabling web-to-phone text messaging and conversation “threading”, so a person using a computer online can receive and respond to another person who is sending messages from his/her phone.

Organizations that are adopting these new “textnologies” are seeing a quick return on their investment simply by being able to reach more students, patients, guests, customers and young adults.

9 Reasons to use Mobile Text Messaging for Sex and Health Education for Teens and Young Adults

1. It’s everywhere they are. Phones are in their pockets and in their purses, everywhere they go. Text messaging offers a quick, discrete method of communication whenever and wherever advice is needed.

2. Text messaging technologies exist that provide anonymous interactions, allowing conversations to be private and confidential.

3. It is difficult to get over the hurdle of calling or coming in face-to-face for advice or help. Starting the conversation via text messaging can lead to more personal interactions (phone or appointment) once a level of comfort has been reached.

4. 80% of 18-34 year olds report cell phone as “lifeline” in a recent survey conducted by Sprint.

5. “Sexting” is a real problem. Utilizing the same medium to educate students can make a positive impact on negative behavior. They are obviously communicating about sex with their peers through text messaging & mobile photos, so this channel is open for healthier conversations.

6. 71% of teens and 90% of college students own a cell phone (Pew Internet and Student Monitor, respectively).  Not all own computers or have the privacy at home to be able to consult health professionals and sex education specialists.

7. Young people already understand texting can be used beyond peer-to-peer interactions. American Idol and youth-targeted marketing campaigns have done this for years, so there is no obstacle or major challenge for them to understand how a text messaging service works.

8. Quick, immediate, real-time availability by health services/information specialists can help prevent delayed, long-term issues.

9. It is a lot easier than you may think to implement a text message service and information helpline to reach more teens and young adults.

Need more information on how you can get started? Visit Mosio’s Mobile Text Messaging Solutions for Health Services page or contact us for a free live demo.

Case Study: Scarleteen